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A GEORGIAN ROMANCE.




‘WANTED, IN CONFIDENCE’

I confess that I don’t have a lot say about this advertisement, found buried in the Personal columns of the Times in the year 1822, but I do hope that the price the gentleman would have needed to pay for it justified whatever was its result!  

MATRIMONY

     ''A Gentleman, a widower, with no encumbrance, will be happy to meet with a lady of good character, about 30 to 35, as a partner for life: the lady is expected to have some fortune, the whole of which may be settled on herself. The advertisers income is five hundred pounds a year, in an estate in the County of Middlesex, and a share in an established house, worth three to four hundred pounds a year;— from the little attention paid to a former application of this sort, the ladies must want confidence and must conclude, no man of property and good character need adopt this mode to get a wife, or think it done out of wantonness, to try the credulity of the sex they will not allow a man for want of connections, may be obliged to live single. — In answer to the first objection, I think that no man would set forth his income unless he could make it appear to the satisfaction of any Lady or her friends, and to be at the expense of advertising, to try the weakness of the sex, he thinks but a poor gratification; he cannot here set forth with propriety, his name of place of abode, as he does not think it very material which way two persons become acquainted, if they fancy each other and their sentiments agree; if therefore, any lady or friend of one disposed to alter her condition, will, from serious motives, address a line or two with particulars, an interviewer may be through the medium of the lady’s friend with out the lady’s friends herself knowing which way we became acquainted, prior to seeing the lady, will inform her friend my name and place of abode, and convince my attentions are sincere and honoured."

    Direct for W. M. left at No 89, Cannon Street, near Walbrook. 

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